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Read Data Sheet. Advanced Concrete Design Software. The most important features of the robot program: Ease of modeling, as you can draw components for metal, concrete, wood and other structures, beams, beams, bases and ceilings with great ease and display them with their sections and 3D modeling. Ease of installing loads, as you can add different loads, whether live or dead on different elements.

Buy now. System requirements for Civil 3D Operating System. See Autodesk’s Product Support Lifecycle for support information. Minimum: 2. We dig deep into our internal management to increase our work efficiency to keep cost down for our clients.

At CMDC, we go directly to the throat of the structural problems and resolve them the best way to meet our clients’ needs, we don’t give ambiguous answers to waste our clients’ time. Timely Responses — Because we are the experts. This free program was originally created by Tekla Corporation. We recommend checking the downloaded files with any free. Aug 25, — Tekla Structures Crack is a delicious and amazing software for Civil Engineers and contractors It provides us building information….

Tekla Structures SP7 Tekla Structural Designer Software for design and analysis of steel and concrete structures by providing detailed maps and details. The application automates various operations and its unique capabilities to analyze and optimize the design of concrete and steel and engineering industries is an ideal option, helps to.

We cannot confirm if there is a free download of this software available. The two end icons designate if you want to snap only to work points used mostly for modeling or all points on corners and edges of objects. Click the footing once to select it. When you have a part highlighted in the model, a mini toolbar will appear next to the mouse pointer and will fade when you move the mouse further away or change the selection.

You can use the toolbar to quickly view or change properties of the object s selected. Complete the dialog box as shown and click Copy then OK. We will first create two of the columns and then use the Copy command to create the other columns.

To create the first two columns: 1. Double-click on the Create column icon. Complete the Column properties dialog box as shown. Pick the intersection of gridlines A-1 p1 to create one column, and then pick grid B-1 p2 to create the second column. Look in 3d view from time to time to check for correct placement. Copy columns 1. Select the columns that you just created by dragging a window across them in a right to left direction. The crossing command functions similar to other computer drawing applications.

You can select multiple parts in the model by holding down the “Ctrl” key when selecting objects in the model individually. At this time if you desired the base plates and anchor bolts could be added to the model so that Anchor Bolt Plans could be created. See chapter 2. Complete the Column properties dialog box as shown for both the Attributes and Position tabs.

We are changing the prefix for both part and assembly so that the Silos will not take the same number type of the rest of our columns i. C1, C2. To select aluminum as the grade required, click the Select…. Hovering your cross hairs over the top edge of the circular base will automatically highlight the snap point at the center because the Points and Grid Intersections snap is activated.

The visibility of objects in views depends on the work area, view depth, view setup, and view filter. You can also temporarily hide parts in a view by using the Hide tool on the pop-up menu. In the pictures hereafter, all the model objects created may not always be visible. Complete the Beam properties dialog box as shown. Pick the intersection of gridlines A-4 and then B-4 as shown below, and notice how the beam automatically appears at the correct level in the 3D view simultaneously.

Note that it is very important to input beams from left to right and bottom to top. Tekla Structures will consider the first end input in the model as the left end.

The same dimension will appear again if you click and highlight a part in the model. Continue adding beams along gridlines 5, 6 and 7. Input beam between columns on grid lines A and B. Filter beams 1. Choose the select filter option Steel Beam filter from the drop down list.

A select filter provides you control over selecting different types of objects using both standard and user-defined filters. By dragging the mouse right to left , select an area in the model as shown below. Notice this only highlights the beams. This is where you want to ‘pick up’ the items you are copying. A message may appear stating objects are outside the work area.

If so, click Do Not Expand as shown below. In some instances, we would want to use Expand, but in this situation it would alter our elevation view. Change the select filter option back to standard as shown below and click in a view, so you will be able to select objects other than beams. Hide silos 4. Select both Silos select one then hold the “Ctrl” key down while selecting the other and right-click to open up the pop-up menu.

While holding the “Shift” key down, select the Hide option as shown below. You can also hide objects without holding down the “Shift” key. When you select the Hide option without the “Shift” key down, the object will not become completely hidden. They will change to Reference Lines. Here we will put in grid line beams at the roof level, but using a different snapping tool that automatically snap the length of the grid line between bays.

Select the Snap to Line button on your snaps toolbar. If you hover over a grid line, you can see an illuminated line appear with an arrow indicating direction. Make sure the arrows are pointing in the proper direction, i.

Create the rest of the beams Next we will create beams in locations where no gridlines intersect. The snapping tools help you pick points to create objects precisely where you need them without having to know the coordinates or layout additional lines or points. If you double-click on an existing beam in the model and click Apply in the Beam Properties dialog box, those settings become active. Then only a single- click on the Create Beam icon is required to add beams with those settings to your model.

Pick a midpoint of the beam between A-2 and A-3 p1 and then the midpoint of the beam between B-2 and B-3 p2 as shown below. We will then pick the second position of beam B using the temporary snap switch Perpendicular. Make sure the Snap to points and grid intersections icon is also pressed down.

Hold down the “Ctrl” key first and then click gridline intersection A-1 p1. This will be a temporary reference point. A green cross will be placed there. Then move the cursor do not pick!! If you just start typing after picking a reference point the Enter a numeric location dialog box will open automatically. Right-click and select Perpendicular, or let the snap grab perpendicular to select a point for the other end of the beam.

Create beam C 8. Click once on the beam icon to get back in the beam command. Pick the intersection of beam B and gridline 2 p1 and then the intersection of gridlines B-2 p2 as shown here. Make sure the Snap to intersection points snap is set. Hold down the “Ctrl” key and pick gridline intersection A-1 p1 to set a temporary reference point. See below. The Enter a numeric location dialog box will open automatically.

Click OK or “Enter”, the cursor will snap to the correct position 13′-0 away from p1 as shown on the following page. Move the cursor to the intersection of A1 again. The beam will now appear. In the 3D view pick the center point of the silo as the point to define the rotation.

Complete the other fields in the dialog. Click Copy and then OK. Select the beams shown highlighted in the picture below press the “Ctrl” key to add parts to the selection. Now click in the 3D view to select the view. A red box will appear around the edge of the view. Right-click in the view now and select ‘Redraw View’.

The model should now look as shown. Double-click on the Create beam icon. Create the second brace 1. Create the next brace by picking the top position of column A-2 and then midpoint of column A-3 as shown below.

We will now adjust this bracing member so that the lower end of the brace is offset 6 inches from the bottom of the column. To do this, we will use handles to move the part end. Select the first brace to display the handles.

Holding down the Alt key while dragging a box across the handle allows for easier selection of that handle or allows selection of multiple handles at that location. This opens the Move – Linear dialog box shown here. Complete the dZ field and click Move, then OK. Remember that this handle may be yellow or magenta in color depending upon whether it is the Start Point yellow or the End Point magenta of the item. Select both braces as shown here by clicking each one individually while holding down the CTRL key.

This opens the Copy – mirror dialog box. In the view, pick two points on grid 3 to define the mirror line. The X0, Y0 and Angle fields automatically change based on these 2 points.

The points that you click to define the mirror represent the baseline of the mirror or the ‘line of symmetry’ in plan. Try to imagine what the image would look like when reflected in a mirror that is placed on the line drawn between the two points you clicked in the model. Load the Beam properties. Click the Select… button to launch the section catalog. The increments that the automatic snap uses are dependent on your zoom level. The further out, the larger the increment.

The further in, the smaller the increment. Use the perpendicular snap to connect the beam to the beam on grid line 6. We will now add some horizontal bracing sections too. First, we will use the Add Points on Line Divided Line Points tool to establish the midpoint between two points we select.

Double-click the icon shown in the left margin. Points Tools allow us to quickly and easily establish points in the model without having to measure and calculate distances. Check that the No. This will place one point half way between the two points you click in the model. If this was set to 2 then it would add two points equally spaced between the points you click effectively dividing the length into 3 equal spaces. Click OK 4. Click the points as shown using the Endpoint snap.

Notice that a tiny cross appears halfway between both points. Now add two W16X50 beams as shown below. Tip: Add the beams from left to right and use the perpendicular snap to ensure they are horizontal in the model. Finally add the horizontal bracing.

Use the Create Beam tool again and select and load the properties for a Horizontal Brace. Click OK and add the bracing going from left to right as shown below. Move Bracing Now move these braces down to within the depth of the floor beams. Highlight both braces by holding down the CTRL key while clicking the members.

Release the CTRL key and right-click the mouse. Select Move Special – Linear and enter -9″ the negative value moves the bracing beams down. Move beam using offset 1. Double-click on the highlighted beam to open the properties dialog.

Go to the Position tab. Adjust the dialog box as shown and click Modify. Notice that the beam has now moved down 3″ while the start and end points have remained in their original position. It really makes very little difference whether you locate beams using offsets or by simply moving them into position. Sometimes there may be speed advantages to be gained by modeling one way rather than another.

Now we have modeled all the steel members in BasicModel1. The model should appear as in the picture below. At this point we have added all the members into the model. We will deal with Reports and Numbering in much more depth later in this manual. In this lesson This lesson introduces the basics of creating system connections in Tekla Structures.

You will learn how to: Create connections Work with connection properties Save the properties for later use. The greatest benefits of using system components are: The connection properties can be saved with a particular name so that they can be used later. These properties can then be used for all projects. If you highlight an object and select options such as edit, copy, or mirror, all connections into the object are automatically included. The connections that are copied or mirrored are exactly the same as the originals.

The same applies to plates and bolts. With AutoDefaults you can create rules defining when to use different connection properties. When applying a connection that you are unfamiliar with, accept the default properties and create the connection. Then look to see what needs to be modified. This is usually quicker than trying to set the values for the connection before seeing what the connection actually creates.

To complete the model we will need to connect the parts. Before creating the connections, all of the members in the model usually collide with other members. By using the Clash check command, we can check which parts in the model collide. We will run a clash check now and again after the connections have been applied.

Select several parts in the model by dragging an area select around a portion of the model, for example the column on gridlines B and 7 and the beams framing into it. Right-click and select Clash check. Tekla Structures displays the clashing objects in the Clash Check Manager dialog box.

You can see that all of the selected parts in the model collide. Select any clashing parts from the list, and Tekla Structures highlights them in the model. Right-click on an item in the list, select Zoom to objects and the model view will zoom to the selected parts.

First, we will create a base plate using the default values. We will then modify the properties of the base plate and finally create the rest of the base plates with the new properties. Create base plate to one column 1. To see pictures of the connection, make sure the Thumbnails icon is active, see below. Both the Details view option and Descriptions option, will provide indication on which components are Recommended by Tekla for the US Environment.

Type “base” into the upper field, and click on the Search button. In the Component Catalog, double-click on the U. Base plate icon. You could also type in the component number you would like to use or have several numbers separated by spaces to show different available connections at the same time.

In the component dialog box, parts colored yellow are parts that will be added by the component, while blue indicates parts that Tekla Structures expects to be already in the model. Click OK to accept the default values.

Pick any column. When prompted, pick the bottom endpoint of the column as the position and the base plate will be created. You can see that the anchor bolts were created as Anchor J-rods. Edit Base Plate We will change the base plate size by modifying the connection properties. Double-click on the green connection symbol, and the Base plate dialog box will reopen.

Select the Parts tab page in the dialog box. Edit the values in the fields shown highlighted in the next figure. Select the Bolts tab in the dialog box. Note the layout for the fields for No. Number of rows for base plates is 2 in each direction by default, so we can leave these fields blank. It is a good idea to click modify at least after each tab is filled out or after filling in each field if you are not sure how the component will react. This way, if there is an error, you do not have to hunt back through your changes to find the problem.

Give the component only the minimal information it needs to get the results you want. Putting in the base plate size and edge distance is all the information we need. Adding spacing information only increases the chance for error later.

If one value should change, we would need to change them all. If we had entered the anchor rod spacing, we should have left the edge distance fields clear. Rod Assy. Remember that just because a part is set to be created does not automatically make it a part of the anchor rod assembly.

The settings on the bolt tab affect anchor spacing and base plate hole size but do not affect anchor rod diameter. Click Apply or OK to accept the properties for use later. Create remaining base plates 1. Press the Enter key to start the base plate command again. Create the rest of the base plates by picking each column and then the position for the base plate.

At this point in a real contract, you would be able to run the Anchor Bolt Drawing and send it out for approval or over to the site, so they can start pouring the bases. For training purposes, however, we will skip this step until later. The shear plate will be welded to the primary beam web and bolted to the secondary beam web.

We will use the connection when the secondary beam is perpendicular to the main member or at a skewed angle to the main member. Create one shear plate connection. The following dialog appears:. Pick the beam on gridline 1 as the main part of the connection. Pick the beam perpendicular to the main part to be the secondary part, and the connection will be created. In the view the work area is closely fitted around the connection. Create connection basic views To create component basic views: 1.

Select the connection symbol. Keep the Component front view open and close the other component basic views. Check bolt dimensions We will now check the bolt location distances and bolt edge distances between bolts and the shear plate. Tekla will automatically change the color of the component cone from green to yellow if an edge distance issue is detected.

The default edge distance is 1. Set your selection to Objects in Components. Pick the bolt group. Pick the shear plate, and the temporary dimensions are shown in the view. The dimensions created are from the part picked in our example, the shear plate to the bolt group. So to measure to the beam, pick the beam in step 3 above.

Notice how Tekla automatically detects the depth of the supported beam and applies the correct number of bolts to the connection automatically. For the double sided beam to column web connections, we will use the Two sided Clip angle connection. That connection uses only one bolt group to go through all three parts. We will then make the wall brace to column connections with Tube gusset This connection uses a gusset plate to connect the beam to the column.

Connection plates welded to the end of the braces will be bolted to the gusset plate. Clip angle We will now use the Clip angle connection to make all single beam to column web connections using the default connection properties. Create clip angles 1. In the component catalog, find the Clip angle connection. Make a clip angle connection at every beam to column web condition where there is only one secondary beam coming to the column web. The column is the main part in the connection, so when prompted, pick the column as the main part and the beam as the secondary part.

Find the Two sided clip angle connection. When prompted, pick the column as the main part. Pick a beam on one side, and then the beam on the other side as the secondary parts. Click the middle mouse button to complete the connection. When there are multiple secondaries you need to click the middle mouse button to complete the selection.

Double-click on the connection cone to open the Two Sided Clip Angle properties dialog box. Then set the Safety Connections property on the Parts tab as shown below. Click Modify when complete, and notice that the angles on one side drop down to allow for safe erection practices. Click Apply then save the connection settings for future use by typing a name in the Save As field and click the Save As button.

Apply the Two sided clip angle to all two sided beam to column webs framing conditions. Create end plates 1. Find the End plate connection. Create connections at all the beam to column flange framing conditions.

Find the Tube gusset 20 connection. Pick the column on grid intersection A-3 as the main part. Pick two adjoining braces, one by one, as secondaries. Click the middle mouse button to create the connection.

While still in the active command, repeat for the other side of the same column. Now we can see that the connection created has two gusset plates each one with two braces. We could also have created a single gusset plate going through the column by creating one connection with the 4 braces.

Create the rest of the tube gussets While still in the command, create the connections to the other ends of the braces by doing the following: 1. Pick the main member column at bottom, beam at top. Pick the brace. Check one tube gusset connection 1. Create Default Views of Component of the tube gusset connection on the center of the X brace. Open the Component front views to make sure there is clearance from the gusset plates to the column web.

To see the column web in the connection front view, you can change the view type in the view properties dialog to rendered. This allows you to snap to all edges of parts rather than just the work points on parts. Select the Measure horizontal distance icon, and check the clearance to the corner of the plate.

Modifying Connections We will modify the connection by adding a clearance between the gusset plates and the column. We will also change the number of bolt rows. Edit the number of bolt rows 1.

On the Bracebolts1 and Bracebolts2 tab pages, edit the number of horizontal and vertical bolt rows and the distance to the first bolt as shown in the next 2 figures. Click Modify and then Apply. The Bracebolts1 tab affects the first picked brace, Bracebolts2 tab the second pick and Bracebolts3 picks This pulls the brace plates outside the column flanges, but now we can see that the plate does not have a square outside edge because of the difference in the angle of the upper and lower braces.

On the Gusset tab, type the value in the field defining the gusset plate width. Add clearance between the gusset plate and the beam While these settings work well to pull the connection plates away from the column, if we used the same settings for the ends at the beam the setback is still too small. On the Picture tab, type the value in the field defining the clearance between the gusset plate and the column.

Click Modify. While we will not see changes to the brace connection where it frames to the column, this setting will affect the brace to beam connections.

Now we will also modify the other tube gusset connections with the new properties we applied. Modify all the tube gusset connections at once We can easily modify only connections of the same type shown in the connection dialog by selecting Ignore other types in the connection dialog box.

Check that Ignore other types is selected in the connection dialog box. Select all the connections in the model by using the Select component select switch shown below and dragging a window around the whole model. By saving the properties with a descriptive name you can easily use them later. You can also get AutoDefaults to automatically use the saved properties in desired cases by setting up AutoDefaults rules. Type Wall bracings in the Save as field in the dialog box.

Click the Save as button. Find the Wraparound Gusset Cross 60 connection. Double-click the connection to open up the parameters. Notice how the numbers are added to help us select the members in the correct order. Click OK and add the connection to the bracing where it meets grid B5 to see what it looks like. Adjust Wrap Plate size We can see that the wrap plate looks small, so we will add bolt rows and shorten our bracing member in order to give the wrap plate a better shape.

Open the system component and go to the Gusset conn 1 tab. Set the bolts as shown. Finally, shorten the brace to adequately clear the column corner by adjusting the setback on the Brace bolts 1 tab. Only three picks are needed per connection, since the column is not present. The end result should look like the image. Check clashing Now we will examine the connection a little more closely to check that it is absolutely correct. Make sure the Select Objects In Components symbol is pressed down.

Select all the objects at the wrap plate connection by dragging a box around them. Right-click and select Clash Check. To quickly locate and view colliding parts in the model, select a lines containing an Assembly ID number. Tekla Structures highlights the parts in the model. Notice that the bolts and beams are highlighted. The bolts from the wrap plate to the beam along grid line 6 are highlighting because they are flagging a potential clearance or access issue.

Upon inspection you will notice that this is probably acceptable enough to allow access in the field, so you can ignore this clash. The bolts from the wrap plate to the other beam are clashing because we added a system component to each side of the connection, and each system component added its own set of bolts in that location. You will notice in the graphic below that the bolts in this location have 2 nuts. Exploding connections has some benefits and some drawbacks. When you explode a connection you remove the link from that connection to the system component that defined it.

This effectively freezes the objects in that connection. They will not change when you modify the system component, so it can prevent you from accidentally changing settings. This also means that if you have a number of exploded system components, you would need to change each and every one individually rather than editing the system component and having it automatically modify all the similar connections in the model.

Choose Explode Component. You will need to do this twice to remove both component symbols. Edit bolt parts 1. Select and delete one set of bolts. You will now notice that the bolts remaining don’t go through all the members. To correct this we must use the Bolt Parts Command. Select the bolts then right-click. Choose Bolt Parts. Make sure you select the angles and not the wrap plate.

Click the middle mouse button to end the command, and the bolts should now go all the way through each member. Select all of the parts by dragging an area select around the whole model.

You can locate specific clashes in the model by selecting lines in the clash check manager. Tekla will highlight the items in the model that are causing that particular clash. Note that one member may cause and report several different clashes with other members and these will all show up on the manager. Different settings on the Select Filters toolbar will allow you to locate different types of clashes. For instance you can restrict the clash check to only look for clashes between members or main members and secondary parts or main members secondary parts and bolts too.

In this lesson In this lesson, we will cover some preliminary tasks that you need to do before starting to model in a real project. We will create a new model and recap the basic functions introduced in lesson 1.

After that, you will learn some more about the basic functions. We will revise how to: Open and save or backup models Input grids Create beams and columns Copy and move items You will learn how to: Adjust attributes of members Input construction points Work in true planes sloped, skewed Use phases.

Click the Open icon. Select the existing model, BasicModel-yourname, and click OK. From the File pull-down menu select Save as….

The grid is created according to the work plane, the current local coordinate system, of the model. So before creating the grid we will temporarily position the work plane to new global coordinates.

The red coordinate arrow symbol indicates the work plane, which is the current local coordinate system of the model. Most of the commands dependent on the coordinate system use the work plane coordinates.

Lay out skew for new grid First, we must create a reference for our new skewed grid system. There are several ways you could accomplish this, but we will use a construction line. Next, click to the perpendicular point on grid line 2 to create the construction line. Select the rotation point on grid line 1 and see how the origin in the dialog box changes to reflect the point selected.

Next, type in 15 for the angle of rotation and this will remain around the Z axis. Click Move. Pick the intersection of the construction line and grid line 1 to set the new origin. Pick a point along the construction line to indicate a new positive X direction. This command keeps the work plane parallel to the current work plane but moves it to a new position using a single picked point.

Create the grid 1. Edit the grid, in the Grid properties dialog box, according to the figure below coordinates and text. The values for the grid size are saved, but to recreate the grid in the proper position you would still need to first set the skewed coordinate again. Alternately, you could create a grid parallel to the default coordinates and rotate it into position later.

Click anywhere in the background. The view should now look like the one below. Create plane views along gridlines We will now create Elevation and Plan views along the skewed gridlines. Select the grid. Click the Show… button on each view plane to open the View properties dialog box, and set the view properties the way you want and click OK.

To be able to manage the objects from the two models after we have combined them we will first transfer the model 2 parts to a different phase. Change the phase for the second building Check objects by phases 1. By default only Phase 1 appears in the dialog box.

Select Phase 1. Click Objects by phases. Add a new phase — Model2 4. Click on the Add button to add a new phase. Edit the name of the new phase to Building 2. Also edit the name of the Phase 1 to Building 1. See that all of the parts are still highlighted in the Building 2 phase. Click Set current. Now all of the parts we create will be in Phase number 2. Pick grid intersections C-1 and F Notice that because our coordinates are set at the skew of the new building, the parts automatically come in rotated to that same skew.

There is no need to set the rotation a second time for the part. While still in the command: 6. Pick grid intersections D-1 and E The footings should now look like those shown below:. Copy the footings We will now copy the footings to other gridlines. Select the footings. Use the CTRL key to select multiple items. Pick two adjacent points along grid line C to define the translation vector 19′-8″ in the x- direction.

Type in the number of copies 6. Click Copy. Adjust the footing at B1 The footings at gridlines B1 and C1 collide, so we will adjust the size and position of the footing on B1 to support both columns. Delete the newly created footing at grid C1. Double-click on the footing on B1 to bring up its properties.

After that we will create the construction points needed to create roof joists. We will copy- translate the completed portal frame and points. Utilizing a sloping work plane and view planes, we will model roof joists.

Finally, we will create vertical eaves bracing on gridlines C and F. We will first create two W30X columns on gridline 1 at C1 and F1. Complete the Column properties profile and levels for the column at grid intersection C1 using prefix and start numbers previously saved. Pick grid intersection C-1 to create the column. Complete the Column properties for the column at grid F1. Pick the grid intersection F-1 to create the second column. Set the profile and top elevation properties as shown below.

Pick the grid intersections at D1 and E1 to create the columns. Next, we will create the floor beams on column line 1. Load the BEAM properties. Enter W24X76 for the beam profile. Place the beams along column line 1, working from bottom to top. Create rafter 1. Enter W30X99 for the rafter profile and click Apply. You may need to expand the 3D view at this point if your rafters are not visible. To do this double-click in open space in the 3D view, then change the dialog as shown below.

These points can be placed in either a plan view at the steel elevation or an elevation view along this column line. First, the floor beam spacing. Double-click on the Add points on line icon. Type 4 and click Apply. Select the grid intersection of C1, then D1 to create five equal spaces 4 points.

Repeat at the bay between grid intersections E1 and F1. Pick the grid intersections D1, then E1 to create 6 equal spaces 5 points in that bay.

Double-click on the Add point along extension of two picked points icon. We use a negative value to make the extension point work back towards the first point clicked. Repeat, picking the points in the reverse order. Create extension point adds or subtracts a point along a line that you specify by clicking two points in the model. The points that are clicked by you in the model define the direction vector; the value you enter defines the distance from the second selected point.

A positive or negative value defines the direction along the defined vector. A positive value means the extension point to be added will further away from the first point clicked, negative means back towards the first point clicked. Using the Add points on line command, divide the space between the two work points that you just created into twelve equal spaces 11 points. Type 11 and click OK. Select the two work points created previously. Copy the members 1. Select the columns, the rafter, beams and the points.

Type the number of copies 6. Enter W24X76 for the beam profile and click Apply. Next, we will model the infill joists in each bay. Enter 18K for the joist profile and click Apply. Pick the joist work point near grid intersection C1 at the command Pick first position. At the command: Pick second point, pick the work point near grid intersection C2.

Pick the endpoint of the joist, then the next work point to set the new copied location. Repeat up to column line F. To place the parts in the correct plane we will first change the work plane which currently is the local coordinate system of the model to the roof slope. To set the work plane to the roof slope: 1. Pick the Set Work using three points icon. Pick the end of the beam near the top of column at grid C1 as the origin. Pick the end of another beam near the top of a column along grid C to define the positive x direction.

Pick the top of the F1 column to define the positive y direction. The work plane is now positioned to the top plane of the rafter. The Set work plane to part top plane command sets the work plane parallel to the part plane front, top, back, bottom on the center line of the part. Joist Orientation without adjusted work plane Joist orientation with adjusted work plane. We can also use the true plan view in drawings.

Working in a true plan view makes it easier to model sloped objects since the grids are also shown in the true plan. The part positioning, copying, etc, however, always comply with the work plane coordinate system no matter in which view you perform the commands. Create true plan view 1.

Load the Plan View pre-defined settings and complete the properties as shown below, click OK. The new view is created. The grid is also shown in the true plan view plane. Notice that because you are now looking directly at the sloping roof, your columns may look a little odd because they are effectively skewed in this view.

This grid displays as a dark red color. Create roof joists We will now create the roof joists by using the Create beam tool. Load the Joist properties. Select a 12K profile for the joists. Pick the joist work point near grid intersection F-1 at the command Pick first position.

At the command: Pick second point, pick the work point near grid intersection F Check the elevation view on grid 1 to ensure that the roof joist is oriented and positioned correctly. Now we must switch the work plane back to the second building in a flat plane to carry on modeling outside of the roof plane. There are a few ways we could do this but we will use one of the existing view planes and match the work plane to it.

Select the open model view. The work plane is now set square to the skewed building. Horizontal Eaves Bracing Working along grid line C we will create vertical bracing using the Create beam tool. Create brace 1. Create one brace using the column top positions at C-1 and C Open the Plan at 59′-8 level and place a brace along the column top positions at F-1 and F Crane Beam Support Stubs Next we will add crane girders to the framing.

Create Stubs 1. Enter W18X40 for the profile size. Move the cursor to snap in the y direction activate the Snap to nearest points option. Practice the use of Polar Tracking in order to fully maximize your modeling speed. Remember relative and absolute snaps can also help you to locate items or points in your model. Copy girders 1. Copy the girders that you created to the other columns on gridline C. Now we must switch the work plane back to the global origin.

Select Plane: XY and set the depth coordinate to 0 and click Change. The work plane is now set back to the global origin. Take some time now to complete the connections on this model using whatever you deem appropriate. You will find many useful connections in the component catalog for connecting the rafters, crane beams and eaves braces to the columns, and there are several joist to beam set ups too. Don’t forget to add the column base plates too. Check that all part properties are consistent The Model 1 parts were created without paying attention to part properties and they may not be consistent with the Model 2 parts color, name, numbering series, and material.

This is important because it will simplify how our automatic drawing output can be handled. For instance: When we created Basic Model 1, we didn’t really pay attention to the Name field in the Part Properties dialog box. The program uses this field to help produce better drawings. Items named as JOIST can be easily omitted from the fabrication drawing production system as these will not be necessary. Part properties can also control how numbering prefixes can be handled.

So to avoid columns and beams all receiving the same prefix we must be disciplined about defining part properties. Select the Beam Filter on toolbar. Now drag a box over the entire model. Everything that should be defined as a BEAM in the Name field of the part properties dialog box should now be highlighted. Notice that only items that were named BEAM are highlighted. Using the predefined attributes that were set up by Tekla ensures that not only will the name field be consistent but the grades and numbering series fields will also be correct.

We will use the names of the part as filtering criteria. For steel beams and columns, we will use the materials as additional filtering criteria to be able to filter them separately. As we will be primarily involved in producing Steel drawings that do not include things like joists, we may like to filter out all the other items in our model. To do this we can create a select filter that excludes us from selecting any item that has a material grade that does not match the rest of the main steel.

Typical wide flange shape material in Tekla Structures is A Enter the name A in the Save as field and click Save as. You can now select the new filter on the drop-down list. Be careful when you do this, you may accidentally miss out on parts you wanted to include. By using the Select from model… option, select filters can be defined for various items including: Slabs Horizontal bracing Vertical bracing Silos Rafters Joists. Create your own select filters to use both for modeling and for automating drawing creation with the help of wizards.

Note that by expanding the save menu using the button on the upper right you have the option to save the same settings as View, Drawing, and Object Representation filters. For the purpose of this manual, however, we will address each separately.

First we will adjust display settings. In a model view, such as your 3d view, double-click in the view background to bring up the View Properties dialog box. Click on the Display button. Using these checkboxes, you can turn on and off objects depending on their hierarchy. Notice how the bolts disappear from the component because we have turned them off in the display properties for this view.

There are also drop-down boxes on the right under Representation. These drop-downs allow you to set the definition for your objects. You can choose to show parts Exact, which looks better visually, or for speed you can set them for Fast.

With your Display dialog still up, check on Bolts under In components again. Select Fast from the drop down menu under Representation.

Notice that our bolts are now shown as black reference lines, instead of displaying as actual bolts. You can set other objects to Fast as well, such as Parts. When parts are set to Fast you will not see cuts and fittings that have been applied, for example copes.

They are still there, and your drawings will be correct.

 
 

Tekla Structures PDF documentation | Tekla User Assistance – What′s new in Tekla Structures 2017i Full Version ?

 

About Anonymous. Привожу ссылку a Comment. Post Top Ad. Saturday, 30 June Anonymous June 30, CAD. Software, Tekla Structures sometimes brand XSTEEL known, the application of the very popular and efficient and professional design and modeling of advanced and modern metal structures and concrete behemoths like stadiums and towers for civil engineering structures And developers and developers of metal structures, which are able to analyze and design all structures tekla structures 2017 pdf documentation free download 3D modeling.

In addition to providing a simple, easy-to-use environment, this software has the ability to automatically complete all the maps of the workshop plan with all the details and details automatically and without the need for any manual drawings. The steel section of the software is known as Xsteel. This section also draws and controls the steel fittings thoroughly and accurately.

The Tekla Structures software in the steel sector is a powerful приведенная ссылка for the use of structural engineers and developers of metalworking and metalworkers’ designs, which, for the following reasons, has placed itself at the forefront of the most advanced software of the structural подробнее на этой странице group. Creating and installing drawings including the outputs of this software, which is easily linked with AutoCAD software.

Also, the project inventory list, tonnage and list of bolts and nuts used for the whole project can страница easily calculated. This application in the design of connections, allows the user to examine the collision and reduce the probable problems in the installation.

The Tekla Structures software tekla structures 2017 pdf documentation free download be used to model both steel and concrete structures. Of course, the program’s capabilities are great for modeling steel structures, especially bolt and nut structures.

Obviously, even the best designers in the two-dimensional space industry are always faced with executive problems due to work in a two-dimensional space, let приведенная ссылка industrial works such as refineries that deal with different departments, such приведенная ссылка plumbing, equipment, electricity, and instrumentation. Faces parallel to the structural part.

For example, the support of the plumbing section, the possibility of placement of equipment, and the possibility of the passage of cable tekla structures 2017 pdf documentation free download In a 3D-based review, these problems are solved carefully and without problems. Key features of this software Tekla Structures: – The possibility of making a structural and structural model of steel with concrete real-life details can be made – Analysis and design of all structures in the form of 3-D источник статьи – Display of the model made on the computer with details such as washers, boltsLacquers, sheets – Moving in the model and seeing it from different angles, you can move like an observer engine inside it.

Release tekla structures 2017 pdf documentation free download release report. Installation guide 1. Install the software by running the TeklaStructures Install the service pack by running TeklaStructuresServicePack6. Do not run the software. Download Crash Report Guide. Download Crack Alone. Discuss this post.

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Tekla structures 2017 pdf documentation free download

 

See Autodesk’s Product Support Lifecycle for support information. Minimum: 2. We dig deep into our internal management to increase our work efficiency to keep cost down for our clients. At CMDC, we go directly to the throat of the structural problems and resolve them the best way to meet our clients’ needs, we don’t give ambiguous answers to waste our clients’ time.

Timely Responses — Because we are the experts. This free program was originally created by Tekla Corporation. We recommend checking the downloaded files with any free. Aug 25, — Tekla Structures Crack is a delicious and amazing software for Civil Engineers and contractors It provides us building information…. Tekla Structures SP7 Tekla Structural Designer Software for design and analysis of steel and concrete structures by providing detailed maps and details.

The application automates various operations and its unique capabilities to analyze and optimize the design of concrete and steel and engineering industries is an ideal option, helps to. We cannot confirm if there is a free download of this software available. Put the power of accessible data-rich models at your fingertips, and enhance efficiency in every phase of your project. Designed by engineers for engineers, Tekla Tedds has been the go-to document and structural analysis software solution for civil and structural engineering needs for over two decades.

This software offers dependable multi-material element design thanks to its extensive, easy-to-inspect and quality-assured library of calculations.

Tekla Structures v Civilax-June 1, 0. The innovative and revolutionary new ETABS is the ultimate integrated software package for the structural analysis and design of buildings. Your email address will not be published. You can see that all of the selected parts in the model collide. Select any clashing parts from the list, and Tekla Structures highlights them in the model.

Right-click on an item in the list, select Zoom to objects and the model view will zoom to the selected parts. First, we will create a base plate using the default values. We will then modify the properties of the base plate and finally create the rest of the base plates with the new properties.

Create base plate to one column 1. To see pictures of the connection, make sure the Thumbnails icon is active, see below. Both the Details view option and Descriptions option, will provide indication on which components are Recommended by Tekla for the US Environment.

Type “base” into the upper field, and click on the Search button. In the Component Catalog, double-click on the U. Base plate icon. You could also type in the component number you would like to use or have several numbers separated by spaces to show different available connections at the same time. In the component dialog box, parts colored yellow are parts that will be added by the component, while blue indicates parts that Tekla Structures expects to be already in the model.

Click OK to accept the default values. Pick any column. When prompted, pick the bottom endpoint of the column as the position and the base plate will be created. You can see that the anchor bolts were created as Anchor J-rods. Edit Base Plate We will change the base plate size by modifying the connection properties. Double-click on the green connection symbol, and the Base plate dialog box will reopen.

Select the Parts tab page in the dialog box. Edit the values in the fields shown highlighted in the next figure. Select the Bolts tab in the dialog box. Note the layout for the fields for No. Number of rows for base plates is 2 in each direction by default, so we can leave these fields blank. It is a good idea to click modify at least after each tab is filled out or after filling in each field if you are not sure how the component will react.

This way, if there is an error, you do not have to hunt back through your changes to find the problem. Give the component only the minimal information it needs to get the results you want. Putting in the base plate size and edge distance is all the information we need. Adding spacing information only increases the chance for error later. If one value should change, we would need to change them all. If we had entered the anchor rod spacing, we should have left the edge distance fields clear.

Rod Assy. Remember that just because a part is set to be created does not automatically make it a part of the anchor rod assembly. The settings on the bolt tab affect anchor spacing and base plate hole size but do not affect anchor rod diameter. Click Apply or OK to accept the properties for use later. Create remaining base plates 1. Press the Enter key to start the base plate command again. Create the rest of the base plates by picking each column and then the position for the base plate.

At this point in a real contract, you would be able to run the Anchor Bolt Drawing and send it out for approval or over to the site, so they can start pouring the bases. For training purposes, however, we will skip this step until later. The shear plate will be welded to the primary beam web and bolted to the secondary beam web. We will use the connection when the secondary beam is perpendicular to the main member or at a skewed angle to the main member.

Create one shear plate connection. The following dialog appears:. Pick the beam on gridline 1 as the main part of the connection. Pick the beam perpendicular to the main part to be the secondary part, and the connection will be created. In the view the work area is closely fitted around the connection. Create connection basic views To create component basic views: 1.

Select the connection symbol. Keep the Component front view open and close the other component basic views. Check bolt dimensions We will now check the bolt location distances and bolt edge distances between bolts and the shear plate. Tekla will automatically change the color of the component cone from green to yellow if an edge distance issue is detected.

The default edge distance is 1. Set your selection to Objects in Components. Pick the bolt group. Pick the shear plate, and the temporary dimensions are shown in the view. The dimensions created are from the part picked in our example, the shear plate to the bolt group. So to measure to the beam, pick the beam in step 3 above. Notice how Tekla automatically detects the depth of the supported beam and applies the correct number of bolts to the connection automatically. For the double sided beam to column web connections, we will use the Two sided Clip angle connection.

That connection uses only one bolt group to go through all three parts. We will then make the wall brace to column connections with Tube gusset This connection uses a gusset plate to connect the beam to the column. Connection plates welded to the end of the braces will be bolted to the gusset plate. Clip angle We will now use the Clip angle connection to make all single beam to column web connections using the default connection properties. Create clip angles 1.

In the component catalog, find the Clip angle connection. Make a clip angle connection at every beam to column web condition where there is only one secondary beam coming to the column web. The column is the main part in the connection, so when prompted, pick the column as the main part and the beam as the secondary part.

Find the Two sided clip angle connection. When prompted, pick the column as the main part. Pick a beam on one side, and then the beam on the other side as the secondary parts. Click the middle mouse button to complete the connection. When there are multiple secondaries you need to click the middle mouse button to complete the selection. Double-click on the connection cone to open the Two Sided Clip Angle properties dialog box. Then set the Safety Connections property on the Parts tab as shown below.

Click Modify when complete, and notice that the angles on one side drop down to allow for safe erection practices. Click Apply then save the connection settings for future use by typing a name in the Save As field and click the Save As button.

Apply the Two sided clip angle to all two sided beam to column webs framing conditions. Create end plates 1. Find the End plate connection. Create connections at all the beam to column flange framing conditions. Find the Tube gusset 20 connection. Pick the column on grid intersection A-3 as the main part. Pick two adjoining braces, one by one, as secondaries.

Click the middle mouse button to create the connection. While still in the active command, repeat for the other side of the same column. Now we can see that the connection created has two gusset plates each one with two braces. We could also have created a single gusset plate going through the column by creating one connection with the 4 braces.

Create the rest of the tube gussets While still in the command, create the connections to the other ends of the braces by doing the following: 1. Pick the main member column at bottom, beam at top. Pick the brace. Check one tube gusset connection 1. Create Default Views of Component of the tube gusset connection on the center of the X brace. Open the Component front views to make sure there is clearance from the gusset plates to the column web.

To see the column web in the connection front view, you can change the view type in the view properties dialog to rendered. This allows you to snap to all edges of parts rather than just the work points on parts. Select the Measure horizontal distance icon, and check the clearance to the corner of the plate. Modifying Connections We will modify the connection by adding a clearance between the gusset plates and the column.

We will also change the number of bolt rows. Edit the number of bolt rows 1. On the Bracebolts1 and Bracebolts2 tab pages, edit the number of horizontal and vertical bolt rows and the distance to the first bolt as shown in the next 2 figures.

Click Modify and then Apply. The Bracebolts1 tab affects the first picked brace, Bracebolts2 tab the second pick and Bracebolts3 picks This pulls the brace plates outside the column flanges, but now we can see that the plate does not have a square outside edge because of the difference in the angle of the upper and lower braces. On the Gusset tab, type the value in the field defining the gusset plate width. Add clearance between the gusset plate and the beam While these settings work well to pull the connection plates away from the column, if we used the same settings for the ends at the beam the setback is still too small.

On the Picture tab, type the value in the field defining the clearance between the gusset plate and the column.

Click Modify. While we will not see changes to the brace connection where it frames to the column, this setting will affect the brace to beam connections. Now we will also modify the other tube gusset connections with the new properties we applied. Modify all the tube gusset connections at once We can easily modify only connections of the same type shown in the connection dialog by selecting Ignore other types in the connection dialog box.

Check that Ignore other types is selected in the connection dialog box. Select all the connections in the model by using the Select component select switch shown below and dragging a window around the whole model.

By saving the properties with a descriptive name you can easily use them later. You can also get AutoDefaults to automatically use the saved properties in desired cases by setting up AutoDefaults rules. Type Wall bracings in the Save as field in the dialog box. Click the Save as button. Find the Wraparound Gusset Cross 60 connection. Double-click the connection to open up the parameters.

Notice how the numbers are added to help us select the members in the correct order. Click OK and add the connection to the bracing where it meets grid B5 to see what it looks like. Adjust Wrap Plate size We can see that the wrap plate looks small, so we will add bolt rows and shorten our bracing member in order to give the wrap plate a better shape. Open the system component and go to the Gusset conn 1 tab.

Set the bolts as shown. Finally, shorten the brace to adequately clear the column corner by adjusting the setback on the Brace bolts 1 tab. Only three picks are needed per connection, since the column is not present.

The end result should look like the image. Check clashing Now we will examine the connection a little more closely to check that it is absolutely correct. Make sure the Select Objects In Components symbol is pressed down. Select all the objects at the wrap plate connection by dragging a box around them.

Right-click and select Clash Check. To quickly locate and view colliding parts in the model, select a lines containing an Assembly ID number. Tekla Structures highlights the parts in the model. Notice that the bolts and beams are highlighted. The bolts from the wrap plate to the beam along grid line 6 are highlighting because they are flagging a potential clearance or access issue. Upon inspection you will notice that this is probably acceptable enough to allow access in the field, so you can ignore this clash.

The bolts from the wrap plate to the other beam are clashing because we added a system component to each side of the connection, and each system component added its own set of bolts in that location. You will notice in the graphic below that the bolts in this location have 2 nuts.

Exploding connections has some benefits and some drawbacks. When you explode a connection you remove the link from that connection to the system component that defined it.

This effectively freezes the objects in that connection. They will not change when you modify the system component, so it can prevent you from accidentally changing settings. This also means that if you have a number of exploded system components, you would need to change each and every one individually rather than editing the system component and having it automatically modify all the similar connections in the model. Choose Explode Component. You will need to do this twice to remove both component symbols.

Edit bolt parts 1. Select and delete one set of bolts. You will now notice that the bolts remaining don’t go through all the members. To correct this we must use the Bolt Parts Command. Select the bolts then right-click. Choose Bolt Parts. Make sure you select the angles and not the wrap plate. Click the middle mouse button to end the command, and the bolts should now go all the way through each member.

Select all of the parts by dragging an area select around the whole model. You can locate specific clashes in the model by selecting lines in the clash check manager. Tekla will highlight the items in the model that are causing that particular clash.

Note that one member may cause and report several different clashes with other members and these will all show up on the manager.

Different settings on the Select Filters toolbar will allow you to locate different types of clashes. For instance you can restrict the clash check to only look for clashes between members or main members and secondary parts or main members secondary parts and bolts too.

In this lesson In this lesson, we will cover some preliminary tasks that you need to do before starting to model in a real project. We will create a new model and recap the basic functions introduced in lesson 1. After that, you will learn some more about the basic functions. We will revise how to: Open and save or backup models Input grids Create beams and columns Copy and move items You will learn how to: Adjust attributes of members Input construction points Work in true planes sloped, skewed Use phases.

Click the Open icon. Select the existing model, BasicModel-yourname, and click OK. From the File pull-down menu select Save as…. The grid is created according to the work plane, the current local coordinate system, of the model. So before creating the grid we will temporarily position the work plane to new global coordinates.

The red coordinate arrow symbol indicates the work plane, which is the current local coordinate system of the model. Most of the commands dependent on the coordinate system use the work plane coordinates. Lay out skew for new grid First, we must create a reference for our new skewed grid system. There are several ways you could accomplish this, but we will use a construction line.

Next, click to the perpendicular point on grid line 2 to create the construction line. Select the rotation point on grid line 1 and see how the origin in the dialog box changes to reflect the point selected.

Next, type in 15 for the angle of rotation and this will remain around the Z axis. Click Move. Pick the intersection of the construction line and grid line 1 to set the new origin. Pick a point along the construction line to indicate a new positive X direction. This command keeps the work plane parallel to the current work plane but moves it to a new position using a single picked point. Create the grid 1. Edit the grid, in the Grid properties dialog box, according to the figure below coordinates and text.

The values for the grid size are saved, but to recreate the grid in the proper position you would still need to first set the skewed coordinate again. Alternately, you could create a grid parallel to the default coordinates and rotate it into position later. Click anywhere in the background. The view should now look like the one below. Create plane views along gridlines We will now create Elevation and Plan views along the skewed gridlines. Select the grid.

Click the Show… button on each view plane to open the View properties dialog box, and set the view properties the way you want and click OK. To be able to manage the objects from the two models after we have combined them we will first transfer the model 2 parts to a different phase.

Change the phase for the second building Check objects by phases 1. By default only Phase 1 appears in the dialog box. Select Phase 1. Click Objects by phases. Add a new phase — Model2 4. Click on the Add button to add a new phase. Edit the name of the new phase to Building 2. Also edit the name of the Phase 1 to Building 1. See that all of the parts are still highlighted in the Building 2 phase.

Click Set current. Now all of the parts we create will be in Phase number 2. Pick grid intersections C-1 and F Notice that because our coordinates are set at the skew of the new building, the parts automatically come in rotated to that same skew.

There is no need to set the rotation a second time for the part. While still in the command: 6. Pick grid intersections D-1 and E The footings should now look like those shown below:. Copy the footings We will now copy the footings to other gridlines. Select the footings. Use the CTRL key to select multiple items. Pick two adjacent points along grid line C to define the translation vector 19′-8″ in the x- direction. Type in the number of copies 6. Click Copy. Adjust the footing at B1 The footings at gridlines B1 and C1 collide, so we will adjust the size and position of the footing on B1 to support both columns.

Delete the newly created footing at grid C1. Double-click on the footing on B1 to bring up its properties. After that we will create the construction points needed to create roof joists.

We will copy- translate the completed portal frame and points. Utilizing a sloping work plane and view planes, we will model roof joists. Finally, we will create vertical eaves bracing on gridlines C and F. We will first create two W30X columns on gridline 1 at C1 and F1. Complete the Column properties profile and levels for the column at grid intersection C1 using prefix and start numbers previously saved.

Pick grid intersection C-1 to create the column. Complete the Column properties for the column at grid F1. Pick the grid intersection F-1 to create the second column. Set the profile and top elevation properties as shown below. Pick the grid intersections at D1 and E1 to create the columns. Next, we will create the floor beams on column line 1. Load the BEAM properties. Enter W24X76 for the beam profile. Place the beams along column line 1, working from bottom to top.

Create rafter 1. Enter W30X99 for the rafter profile and click Apply. You may need to expand the 3D view at this point if your rafters are not visible. To do this double-click in open space in the 3D view, then change the dialog as shown below.

These points can be placed in either a plan view at the steel elevation or an elevation view along this column line.

First, the floor beam spacing. Double-click on the Add points on line icon. Type 4 and click Apply. Select the grid intersection of C1, then D1 to create five equal spaces 4 points.

Repeat at the bay between grid intersections E1 and F1. Pick the grid intersections D1, then E1 to create 6 equal spaces 5 points in that bay. Double-click on the Add point along extension of two picked points icon. We use a negative value to make the extension point work back towards the first point clicked.

Repeat, picking the points in the reverse order. Create extension point adds or subtracts a point along a line that you specify by clicking two points in the model. The points that are clicked by you in the model define the direction vector; the value you enter defines the distance from the second selected point. A positive or negative value defines the direction along the defined vector. A positive value means the extension point to be added will further away from the first point clicked, negative means back towards the first point clicked.

Using the Add points on line command, divide the space between the two work points that you just created into twelve equal spaces 11 points. Type 11 and click OK. Select the two work points created previously. Copy the members 1. Select the columns, the rafter, beams and the points. Type the number of copies 6. Enter W24X76 for the beam profile and click Apply. Next, we will model the infill joists in each bay.

Enter 18K for the joist profile and click Apply. Pick the joist work point near grid intersection C1 at the command Pick first position. At the command: Pick second point, pick the work point near grid intersection C2.

Pick the endpoint of the joist, then the next work point to set the new copied location. Repeat up to column line F. To place the parts in the correct plane we will first change the work plane which currently is the local coordinate system of the model to the roof slope. To set the work plane to the roof slope: 1. Pick the Set Work using three points icon. Pick the end of the beam near the top of column at grid C1 as the origin.

Pick the end of another beam near the top of a column along grid C to define the positive x direction. Pick the top of the F1 column to define the positive y direction. The work plane is now positioned to the top plane of the rafter.

The Set work plane to part top plane command sets the work plane parallel to the part plane front, top, back, bottom on the center line of the part. Joist Orientation without adjusted work plane Joist orientation with adjusted work plane. We can also use the true plan view in drawings. Working in a true plan view makes it easier to model sloped objects since the grids are also shown in the true plan. The part positioning, copying, etc, however, always comply with the work plane coordinate system no matter in which view you perform the commands.

Create true plan view 1. Load the Plan View pre-defined settings and complete the properties as shown below, click OK.

The new view is created. The grid is also shown in the true plan view plane. Notice that because you are now looking directly at the sloping roof, your columns may look a little odd because they are effectively skewed in this view. This grid displays as a dark red color. Create roof joists We will now create the roof joists by using the Create beam tool. Load the Joist properties. Select a 12K profile for the joists.

Pick the joist work point near grid intersection F-1 at the command Pick first position. At the command: Pick second point, pick the work point near grid intersection F Check the elevation view on grid 1 to ensure that the roof joist is oriented and positioned correctly. Now we must switch the work plane back to the second building in a flat plane to carry on modeling outside of the roof plane.

There are a few ways we could do this but we will use one of the existing view planes and match the work plane to it. Select the open model view. The work plane is now set square to the skewed building. Horizontal Eaves Bracing Working along grid line C we will create vertical bracing using the Create beam tool. Create brace 1. Create one brace using the column top positions at C-1 and C Open the Plan at 59′-8 level and place a brace along the column top positions at F-1 and F Crane Beam Support Stubs Next we will add crane girders to the framing.

Create Stubs 1. Enter W18X40 for the profile size. Move the cursor to snap in the y direction activate the Snap to nearest points option. Practice the use of Polar Tracking in order to fully maximize your modeling speed.

Remember relative and absolute snaps can also help you to locate items or points in your model. Copy girders 1. Copy the girders that you created to the other columns on gridline C. Now we must switch the work plane back to the global origin. Select Plane: XY and set the depth coordinate to 0 and click Change.

The work plane is now set back to the global origin. Take some time now to complete the connections on this model using whatever you deem appropriate.

You will find many useful connections in the component catalog for connecting the rafters, crane beams and eaves braces to the columns, and there are several joist to beam set ups too. Don’t forget to add the column base plates too.

Check that all part properties are consistent The Model 1 parts were created without paying attention to part properties and they may not be consistent with the Model 2 parts color, name, numbering series, and material.

This is important because it will simplify how our automatic drawing output can be handled. For instance: When we created Basic Model 1, we didn’t really pay attention to the Name field in the Part Properties dialog box. The program uses this field to help produce better drawings. Items named as JOIST can be easily omitted from the fabrication drawing production system as these will not be necessary. Part properties can also control how numbering prefixes can be handled.

So to avoid columns and beams all receiving the same prefix we must be disciplined about defining part properties. Select the Beam Filter on toolbar. Now drag a box over the entire model. Everything that should be defined as a BEAM in the Name field of the part properties dialog box should now be highlighted. Notice that only items that were named BEAM are highlighted. Using the predefined attributes that were set up by Tekla ensures that not only will the name field be consistent but the grades and numbering series fields will also be correct.

We will use the names of the part as filtering criteria. For steel beams and columns, we will use the materials as additional filtering criteria to be able to filter them separately. As we will be primarily involved in producing Steel drawings that do not include things like joists, we may like to filter out all the other items in our model. To do this we can create a select filter that excludes us from selecting any item that has a material grade that does not match the rest of the main steel.

Typical wide flange shape material in Tekla Structures is A Enter the name A in the Save as field and click Save as. You can now select the new filter on the drop-down list.

Be careful when you do this, you may accidentally miss out on parts you wanted to include. By using the Select from model… option, select filters can be defined for various items including: Slabs Horizontal bracing Vertical bracing Silos Rafters Joists.

Create your own select filters to use both for modeling and for automating drawing creation with the help of wizards. Note that by expanding the save menu using the button on the upper right you have the option to save the same settings as View, Drawing, and Object Representation filters.

For the purpose of this manual, however, we will address each separately. First we will adjust display settings. In a model view, such as your 3d view, double-click in the view background to bring up the View Properties dialog box.

Click on the Display button. Using these checkboxes, you can turn on and off objects depending on their hierarchy. Notice how the bolts disappear from the component because we have turned them off in the display properties for this view. There are also drop-down boxes on the right under Representation. These drop-downs allow you to set the definition for your objects. You can choose to show parts Exact, which looks better visually, or for speed you can set them for Fast.

With your Display dialog still up, check on Bolts under In components again. Select Fast from the drop down menu under Representation. Notice that our bolts are now shown as black reference lines, instead of displaying as actual bolts. You can set other objects to Fast as well, such as Parts. When parts are set to Fast you will not see cuts and fittings that have been applied, for example copes.

They are still there, and your drawings will be correct. It is just a visual setting. You can set your bolts back to Exact before continuing, and close the Display properties dialog box. If it is not currently open, double-click in the view background to bring up the View Properties dialog box. Under Visible Object Group, there is a drop-down menu for predefined view filters. Select Steel Column from the drop-down menu and click Modify. When we do this you can see that all parts that do not meet the criteria in the Steel Column filter are removed from the view.

This can greatly aid in creating drawings when used like the selection filter. Click on the Object Group button in your View Properties dialog box.

You should see the settings that are activated for the Steel Column filter we just used. You can use similar fields to build your own view filter just like we did for the selection filter earlier. Select standard from the drop down menu at the top of the dialog box, and the fields should all clear back to default. You can now build your own. Pick one of the part rows and change it to match below.

Using the view filters, you can show parts of a certain phase, material grade, size, or even filter for specific part or assembly position numbers if you need to find them. Note that you can set up this information at any time, but the most logical time to do this is right at the start of the contract. Project properties Preferences Tekla Structures contains a powerful tool to help productivity with regard to setting up information that may be repeated over several contracts.

All this information can be entered once then stored in a “Firm or Project Folder” so that the next time you start a new model on a particular project or for a particular client you already have the settings required. Set up project properties 1. Note that default information has been added in the dialog box to show you what fields will apply when used on templates.

Replace the defaults with project information. Check preferences Before starting the modeling, we will check that preferences are set up correctly. Check that your preferences are set up correctly before you start modeling. If you change settings on the Preferences tab, Tekla Structures only applies the new settings to connections you subsequently create.

Connections you created prior to changing the preferences are not affected. For Components, check the values are as below, and click OK. The bolt edge distance factor does not actually affect connections created by Tekla; it only sets the value for the bolt edge distance warning in the bottom left. Under Orientation marks, you can set north direction by degrees from global X as shown on the next page.

In this lesson Tekla Structures system components cover a great variety of the components used in most projects. However, you may come across situations where it’s not possible to make the necessary connections in your model using the system components. In this chapter we will take advantage of the Tekla Structures tube gusset connection by using it as a base for a customized connection.

We will explode the system component, modify the ungrouped objects and then add objects to the connection using a system component detail.

We will also create a whole new connection i. We will learn how to: Adapt a System Component to our specific needs Combine one System Component with another to create a complex connection Create a Custom Component interactively Apply the created component around the model. You can, however, create the stiffeners separately by using a system component detail.

We will explode an existing tube gusset connection, modify the gusset plate shape and then create stiffeners in the connection using a system component detail. Near the bottom end of the column at grid A-2 is a Tube Gusset 20 connection. In the figure on the left, we see the connection before the stiffeners have been added. In the figure on the right, we see how the connection will look after the stiffeners have been added.

Select the component symbol. Adjust the size of the window as needed. Explode gusset plate connection Inside of the system connection we are not able to reshape the gusset plate the way it is shown in the figure on the previous page. In situations where the connection parameters do not contain a particular option, we must edit the parts outside of the connection.

In order to modify connection objects outside the connection, we need to explode the connection to ungroup the objects in the connection. Modifications when done outside of the connection dialog box without first exploding the connection will result in the changes being overwritten if the connection were to get updated. Before exploding the connection you should take advantage of the connection to get as close to the desired result as possible since editing connection macros is faster and easier than editing objects outside the connection.

Explode connection To explode the connection: 1. Right-click and select Explode Component. All connection objects even if they are set to “not visible” in the view properties will become visible. Now all of these objects have lost intelligence and association to the connection dialog box. After exploding the connection, the objects that were in the connection are no longer connection objects.

They will be presented in the model as objects main parts both in wire frame and in shaded wire frame. The system component added the gusset plate using the ‘Contour Plate’ command that we have not actually learned yet. The contour plate features special editable corners that can be adjusted easily.

This exercise highlights how to edit a component that has been added by the system. This is the quickest way to work when 3D modeling. Add the system component closest to your needs, and then edit it as necessary. We will first create a temporary construction line to help to locate the bottom right corner of the gusset plate.

We want to work in plane view, not 3d, while making cuts. Click the Add construction line icon. While holding down Ctrl, pick the top left corner of the gusset plate as a reference point. Next right-click and select Perpendicular to turn on just that snap. Pick a perpendicular snap at the column flange edge and the construction line is created.

Make sure the plate is highlighted. You will see 3 magenta boxes and one yellow. Pick the gusset plate corner 1 , see the figure below. Pick the intersection of the gusset plate edge and the construction line 2. Snap to the perpendicular point on the gusset plate edge and pick point 3.

Make sure you pick the plate edge and not the gridline. Pick the gusset plate top left corner 4. Pick the bottom corner-right on the yellow box 5 as the corner to be removed. The plate is now reshaped. The same result may be accomplished by using the cut command.

Add stiffeners We will now add stiffeners to our connection using the Multiple Stiffeners detail. In this case we are interested in setting the stiffener spacing.

Create stiffeners using macro 1. Double-click on the component icon. Edit the fields shown highlighted on each of the tab pages shown below, and click Apply. Pick the column. Pick the midpoint of the gusset plate, and the stiffeners are created.

We could now explode the stiffener detail, but since we have not edited the connection objects except for the detail, we can also just leave it.

This will effectively remove the item from the component and the connection in the model. Next, modify the connections at the top of the vertical bracing using the knowledge learned so that the connections look like this.

As an example we will now create plates, a polygon cut, a fitting, a bolt group and welds interactively in order to create the unusual looking connection shown below. Create plate and fitting for the beam Create default views of component views and delete the connection At grid intersection A1 at level the top of the roof beams on Basic Model 1 1. Delete the existing connection. Create end plate for the beam We will now use the beam command to create the end plate for the beam.

Start the beam command double click beam icon , and Apply the properties for the end plate shown in the dialog box below. It is possible to create plates by using either the beam or the contour plate command. In the Component front view: 4. Right click in the view, select Properties, and set view depths to 0″. This will keep distant items from showing in the view you are working in. To pick the end position, hold down the Ctrl key, and pick the intersection of the top beam flange and the toe of the column flange.

The plate then appears. Move the plate into position Now move the plate into position by working in the Component Front View. Highlight the plate, right click and select the Move command. Select the left edge then the right edge of the plate. This will allow a gap for the column plate across the flange toes. We will use the Fitting command to trim the end of the beam at the end plate. The Fitting tool will trim the end of the beam on a plane perpendicular to the view plane, which is defined by picking two points on a line.

Go to your Component Top view. Click on the Create fitting icon. Select the beam as the part to be fitted. Pick the points on the end plate corners to set the cut line for the fitting. We will use the Component end view for ease of picking points to place the plate. We will then move the plate to the correct depth. Move the cursor over the top left corner of the end plate, and hold down the CTRL key before clicking. After you have clicked the left top corner of the end plate, release the CTRL key 5.

Then move the cursor to the outside of the column flange and using the perpendicular snap, click the first point of the plate. Move the cursor to the opposite flange of the column, and use the perpendicular snap to define the next point of the plate.

Now move the mouse over the bottom right corner of the plate, and hold down the CTRL key before clicking. After you have clicked the right bottom corner of the end plate, release the CTRL key. Then use the perpendicular snap to the edge of the flange to define the third point on the plate. Finally, use the perpendicular snap to the outside of the opposite flange to complete the plate. Move the plate 1. In the Component top view, select the column connection plate, right-click and select Move.

Move the plate in the x direction and only x so that it is next to the end plate. We will now adjust the plate by moving the contour plate chamfer boxes in order to provide this. Move Contour Plate Chamfers 1. Select the contour plate. Select one of the boxes. The vertical edge will look sloped until the bottom chamfer is modified too. This will also add the plates to the beam and column assemblies. Double-click on the Create weld icon. Edit the Weld properties dialog as shown below, and click OK.

Select the beam as the part to weld to the primary part for workshop welds. Select the end plate as the part to be welded the secondary part for workshop welds.

It is very important to enter the welding order correctly. Tekla Structures uses the welding order to determine the primary and secondary parts of the assembly. This affects the position of the parts in the drawings. Inquire assembly You can check assemblies using the command Inquire Assembly. Pick the beam or any part of the assembly. The main part of the assembly will appear red and other parts will appear yellow.

To select the entire assembly: press the Alt key while clicking a part in the assembly. You can also use Polygon Welds to joint two parts. Polygon Welds require you to define the exact position of the weld by picking the points you want the weld to traverse. This type of weld is more advanced and time consuming to detail than a basic weld. Weld connection plate to the column By using the applied weld properties, weld the connection plate to the column.

Create bolt group Next we will create a bolt group to connect the beam to the column. Double-click on the Create bolts icon. Define the bolt group properties as shown in the picture, and select Apply. Pick the column connection plate as the part to bolt to. Pick the end plate as the part to be bolted. Click the middle mouse button to finish selecting parts. Pick the end plate top point as the first point this will be the bolt group origin.

Pick the end plate bottom point as the second point this will indicate the bolt group’s x direction. For best results, try to keep the work points of your bolt group in between the parts you are trying to bolt — for instance, between two plates the work points should be on the shear plane. If you were bolting through a larger area such as though an HSS member, the work points should be on centerline of the part.

Obviously, we want to avoid having to remake it each time. So we can save it as a custom component then apply it to other locations. In this part of the exercise we will: Define the Custom Component Replace an existing connection with our newly created custom component Notice that the connection we made currently does not have a green cone The Component Symbol.

For the purpose of Basic Training we will only deal with the Connection which is defined as two or more members coming together. The advanced training course deals with the other types of custom components in much more detail.

Create the custom component 1. Complete the details as shown above.

 
 

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Select the first brace to display the handles. Buy Now. Pick the joist work point near grid intersection F-1 at the command Pick first position. Tekla will highlight the items in the model that are causing that particular clash. The numeric units used in the Grid dialog box as well as in other modeling dialog boxes can be controlled from the Units and decimals It is very important to enter the welding order correctly. You could also type in the component number you would like to use or have several numbers separated by spaces to show different available connections at the same time.